Research

Projects

1. Discovery of novel cancer and immunology therapeutics.

Underlying all our projects is a goal to discover and characterize novel therapeutic agents. Here, we use chemical and biological screening and  structure-based drug design to identify new biologically active molecules. Specific projects focus on immune checkpoint proteins, adhesion molecules, small GTPases, and metabolic enzymes.

2. Butyrophilin ligands as cancer immunotherapies.

T cells play critical roles in human diseases including cancer immunosurveillance. By developing novel compounds that activate or inhibit  T cell functions, we aim to gain understanding of their activation mechanisms and how they can function to control development of cancer. Our most advanced project in this area focuses on  butyrophilin agonists and their impacts on non-traditional T cell activation.

3. Integrin regulatory proteins as therapeutic targets.

Underlying cellular immunity are the stable contacts that immune cells form with other cells (i.e. synapses), which allow for information exchange and subsequent immune response. As the major proteins involved in cell adhesion, integrins are critical to the successful conduct of cell-mediated immunity. We seek to identify novel ways to impact integrin signaling and function to manipulate the immune response.

 

Prospective Students

Prospective graduate students may apply to the lab through several routes:

Or, just shoot me an email, tweet, LinkedIn request, etc and I will answer your questions and figure out if its a good fit!

Prospective undergraduate students (typically from MCB, PNB, or BIO) may send a resume or transcript to andrew.wiemer@uconn.edu.